Monday, August 9, 2010

Industrial Disease


I have industrial disease. And you do, too. I'm waking up from our shared delusion of living in the "more, more, more", consumer-driven, petroleum-based, disaster that we call our society. And you can, too. But you can't look away. You have to look and read and become truly informed. And maybe the hardest part? You have to admit we've all been duped.


My industrial disease manifests itself in all kinds of ways - both physical and mental. Physically, I've become wheat-sensitive (the reason which is another post in itself); I have inflamed tendons in my heels from being on my feet 8 hours a day for a pittance; I would find it extremely difficult to function without my car; I'm becoming allergic to lotions, soaps, make-up and especially perfume (hi Sherri); and the internet is my lifeline. Mentally, I struggle with strong emotional responses: depression, anxiety, nihilism. Then sometimes, like now, I feel alive and real like I never have before. I feel the kundalini energy tugging at the chakras.


Those are some late-stage symptoms. Early stage symptoms were a deep sense of disconnection from source, bad - as a matter of fact, very bad decisions based on false assumptions about how to live life, an appetite for drugs and alcohol that overrode my wise mind and early family issues I couldn't resolve at the time.


I'm almost 49 years old and though I'm sober today, I will be living with the affects of my use the rest of my life. I think I've finally accepted that. I've discovered a new commitment to myself and the earth and its inhabitants and the only thing I really want, which is to be awake and sober right now, is mine as I choose it. If I didn't take action now about the things I see happening, I would never forgive myself. I've made a mess of most of my life, but I can make a difference now. And so can you.


I don't know if many people are still visiting my blog. But I'm calling on what readers I have and my fellow bloggers to help me draw attention to the people on the ground in the Gulf who are reporting the real story. We have to fight. For ourselves, for the earth, for future generations if there are to be any. Information is currency. Food is going to be currency.


Sign the petition. Write your congressmen. But don't expect the change to come from them. It will only come from us. Put a link on your blog to Drew Wheelan and Jonathan Henderson. Even if it's impossible to wake up to the whole picture right now, wake up to this part.
Thank you for visiting Eclectic Recovery.

3 comments:

Paula said...

Hi ANgela, I just recently found your blog and it gives me hope. Well, I am German and grew up with organic food, cotton bags, recycled trash and a strong environmental awareness. Now Iam going to marry my American partner in November and during my first longer visit in the US I was shocked to the bone. Please do not get me wrong. Here in germany are still many things which needd to be improved. Yet organic food doesnt cost more than normal food. Gen-manipulated food is a big NO NO and if one really wants to have aplastic bag at teh supermarket - one has to pay for them. Obviously just small examples here, yet I was so shocked when I went to the supermarkets, the prices about organic food, if available, all this convenience food, drugstore drive through etc etc - not even going into the BIG issues. For over a year I couldnt decide to move. For me it is a big step backwards in awareness and action. Therefore your blog is on of the resources of hope and future actions for me! Thanks for being out there.

Diva Carla said...

Angela,
thanks for keeping on keeping on. I realize I have to finish my ebook and get it posted on the Peace chamber blog. It's right in line with your post. I think you are on to something with Industrial disease, which includes symptoms of addiction, escapism, boredom, thrill seeking, wastefulness, denial, and despair.

Sherri said...

I recognize those symptoms. I'm sorry to hear you've developed a sensitivity to body care products. That sucks, man! It's really hard to manage when the whole industry is out of control. People don't stop to think. And I guess that's the whole problem here. I come up against a lot of resistance by dismissal, people just don't want to be bothered. It doesn't affect them, so they don't want to think about it. It seems we as a culture have lost the ability to take care of ourselves. We spend like crazy despite knowing the pitfalls, we slather ourselves with untested chemicals because the media tells us to, we are sexually careless and addicted to escapism...and I'm including my former self in all that. What I'm trying to figure out is, how do I instill in my children the desire to be responsible, when even adults can't seem to get there? And when everything around them is telling them to have fun at all cost?

Sorry for the rant, but you started it. ;-)

Hey, I'm about to buy a scale so I can make bigger batches of soap--would you like me to send you a homemade bar?